Showing posts with label City Guide. Show all posts
Showing posts with label City Guide. Show all posts

Helsinki Tours and Concise City Guide

Bargaining


Prices are fixed in Finland.

Tipping

All restaurant checks include a service charge. It is not really necessary to leave an addition tip, although if preferred, it is enough to round the amount up to the nearest 5 or 10 euro.


Local Cuisine

As in other Scandinavian countries, the Smorgasbord is most popular, a buffet with a wide range of hot and cold dishes featuring plenty of seafood, not least the Baltic herring and smoked Salmon. There are a variety of ways of serving Reindeer, one of which is cold and smoked. Bear and Elk may appear on the menu and there is also plenty of game. The Finns enjoy pastries and desserts, a particular favorite being the Cloud berry, found extensively in northern Scandinavia, it is a variation of the Raspberry, slightly more tart.


Drink Specialties


Coffee is the most common beverage in Finland, although it is renowned for its Vodka. There are a number of local wines produced, made from berries and other fruits, as well as fruit liqueurs such as 'Lakka' which is made from Cloud berries.


Shopping

Shops are generally open from 9:00 a.m. - 5.00 p.m. Monday through Saturday, although some store may close early on Saturday. Some of the more tourist orientated shops will open from Noon - 4.00 p.m. on Sunday.

The main shopping areas are Pohjoisesplanadi, Aleksanterinkatu, the Forum Shopping Mall on Mannerheimintie and Iso Roobertink. The main items of interest are furniture designs, quality clothing, glassware and ceramics. Lapp crafts, wooden carvings and reindeer skin items are popular souvenirs.

Kauppatori Market is held in the area surrounding the South Harbor. It is quite fascinating, the most perfect display of fruit and vegetables can be seen throughout the morning.

U.S. Dollars are not accepted in Helsinki, although most major credit cards are.

Value Added Tax (VAT) is added to most purchases. Visitor who spend over a certain amount may be entitled to re-claim some or all of the tax paid. In Scandinavia many stores participate in "Tax Free Shopping", ask for a "Tax Free" receipt to get reimbursed.


Local Currency

The unit of currency in Finland is the euro. There are 8 euro coins denominated in 2 and 1 euros, along with 50, 20, 10, 5, 2, and 1 cent pieces. Every euro coin carries a common European face. On the obverse, each Member State decorates the coins with their own motifs. No matter which motif is on the coins they can be used anywhere inside the Member States. There are 7 euro notes. In different colors and sizes, they are denominated in 500, 200, 100, 50, 20, 10, and 5 euros. The notes are uniform throughout the euro area. Unlike coins, they have no national side. All euro notes are legal tender in all countries of the euro area.

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Saint Petersburg, Russia | Concise City Guide

Saint Petersburg, Russia With It's City Guide, bargaining, tipping, cuisine, drink specialties, shopping, currency, post office, tourist information
A few things to remember before you visit Saint Petersburg.

Local Customs





Bargaining

Bargaining in Saint Petersburg is expected when dealing with street vendors or in markets.
Tipping : Services charges are not usually added to restaurant bills, however, a small gratuity (10 - 15 %) is appreciated.

Local Cuisine:

Russia has typical dishes, such as : Borsht, a beetrot soup, Beef Stroganoff, thin slices of beef braised with mushrooms, onions and sour cream, and perhaps the known, Chicken Kiev, chicken breasts wrapped around garlic butter, usually breaded and sauteed. The Russians are also well-known for their Caviar (Sturgeon's roe) small, black eggs, slightly salty, served with finely chopped hard-boiled egg and onion with miniature pancakes (blinis).


Drink Specialties:

Vodka is the favorite here, drunk ice cold, as a shot. There are a lot of kinds of vodkas available, many with subtle flavorings such as pepper or lemon or some other fruit. There are several quite acceptable wines produced locally and the Russian Brandies are quite comparable.


Shopping:

The main shopping district is centered around Nevsky Prospekt. The typical Russian souvenirs are : local handicrafts such as matrioshka dolls, lacquer boxes, painted wooden spoons and other wood-carved itmes and local prints, are available from street vendors.


Local Currency

The unit of currency in Russia is the Ruble. Notes are available in the following denominations : 10, 50, 100 and 1000. Coins are issued in amounts of 5, 10, 50 Kopecks with 100 Kopecks in a Ruble. It is controlled currency. It is illegal to bring it into or take out of Russia. Visitors should exchange currency and convert any remaining prior to leaving Saint Petersburg. A receipt for the exchange must be retained. It is also advisable to return your remaining Rubles to the same bank or exchange office that you purchased the from. Exchange facilities are available at most of the larger hotels and official bank or currency exchange offices found throughout the city. It is not recommended to exchange currency on the street.


Post Office and Telephone Facilities


The central Post Office is located at Konnogvardejsky bulvar, 4. International calls can be made from Saint Petersburg International and Domestic Telephone Exchange and Business Centre with pre-purchased phonecards, available in different denominations; It is located at 3/5 Bolshoya Morskaya Street between the Hermitage Museum and Nevsky Prospekt. Some hotels have satellite telephone booths from which international calls can be placed.


AT&T : +7812.325.5042
MCI :+7095.747.3322
SPRINT :+7095.747.3324


Tourist Information

The official Tourist Information Office is located on Nevsky Prospekt, 41. Most hotels provide information services for guests or otherwise, although there is generally a fee.


Transportation:

Taxis are available anywhere but make sure you choose the driver who can speak English. Only a few taxi drivers speak English. In addition, It is advisable to negotiate a fare prior to departing and recommended to travel with a companion. It is dangerous to hail a cab with more than one person in it. Saint Petersburg has a bus and tram system but it is not wise to use by foreigners who do not speak Russian.

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    Five Minute Tallinn Guide

    A few things to remember when you get around Tallinn:


    Bargaining 


     Bargaining is expected when dealing with street vendors or in markets.


    Tipping


    Services charges are not usually added to restaurant bills, however, a small gratuity is appreciated.


    Local Cuisine 


     Hors d'oeuvres are usually the best part of the meal, soups can also be quite good. Estonia is known for its local specialties of jellied veal (sult), and roast stuffed breast of veal, served with herring and beets in a vinaigrette dressing (Taidetud Vasikarind)


    Drink Specialties 


    Some restaurants and bars serve western drinks, locally produced varieties are generally poor by comparison. The Estonian liqueur is Vana Tallinn and the local beer Saku is very popular.


    Shopping


     The main shopping area is located in the old town, around Raekoja Plats (Town Hall Square) and along Pikk and Viru Streets. Opening hours are generally from 9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Tallin is very popular with amber, linen and local handicrafts such as knitted woolens, leather prouducts and art works.


    Local Currency


     The unit of currency in Estonia is the Kroon (EEK0. There are 100 cents to the Kroon. Notes are available in the following denominations: 1, 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 500 Kroons. There are exchange facilities at the Hotel Viru, Hotel Olumpia, Hotel Palace, and the main Post Office in Old Town.


    Post Office and Telephone Facilities


    The central Post Office is located at 1 Narva Maantee, opposite Viru Hotel. International calls can be made from the Post Office, or from a number of street public phones.


    AT&T : 800-800-1001
    MCI : No Access
    SPRINT : No Access


    Tourist Information 


     The City Tourist Office is located at 4 Kullssepa Street (Town Hall Square).


    Transportation 


     A small number of taxis may be available on the streets. All taxis should operate by meter. There is a taxi stand at Viru Valjak in Tallinn.


    Tallinn also offers a choice of trams, trolleybuses, buses, route taxis and taxis. Route taxis follow a fixed route and stop at the passengers' request. Tickets for trams, trolleybuses and buses can be brought from stalls near the stops and must be validated inside the vehicle. The trolleybus and bus service tend to be infrequent and crowded.


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    Concise Oslo Guide

    Oslo Guide, Norway

    Oslo, Norway

    Local Customs

    Bargaining is not usually accepted in Oslo.

    Tipping

    Service charges are included in restaurant pricing. It is appropriate to tip 10 % for good service. Taxis fare are usually rounded up to the nearest 5 or 10 NOK.

    Local Cuisine

    In Scandinavia, including Oslo, 'Koldtbord' (Cold Table) or Buffet style meal is very popular. They usually put salmon in it. Salmon is nationally popular. Reindeer appears on many menus, particularly further north, similar to beef, but richer, slightly sweet flavored meat. The Norwegians are partial to wild berries, either as an accompaniment to meat or as a dessert. Two varieties native to Norway are Lingonberries, similar to cranberries, and Cloudberries, like orange colored raspberries, they are a little crunchy and taste sharper.

    Drink Specialties

    In Norway, people often drinks coffee. Although alcohol is very expensive in Norway, the favorite tipple is the local brand of Aquavit, a potato based liqueur, common throughout Scandinavia, usually served ice cold and drunk as a shot.

    Shopping

    The main shops are located about 1 mile from the ship's berth, centered around Karl Johans Gate. You can find a lot of shops at Aker Brygge. Shops generally open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday, close at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday.

    Local handicrafts include the traditional knitted sweaters in nordic design, good quality silverware, pewter, wrought-iron accessories, glass and ceramics, national costumes and furs. Trolls make popular souvenirs, as do candles and the Norwegian invented Cheese Plane or slicer.

    U.S. Dollars may be accepted in some of the more touristic stores and most major credit cards are widely accepted.

    Value Added Tax (VAT) is added to most purchases. Visitor who spend over a certain amount may be entitled to re-claim some or all of the tax paid. In Scandinavia many stores participate in "Tax Free Shopping", ask for a "Tax Free" receipt to get reimbursed.

    Local Currency

    The unit of currency in Norway is the Krone (NOK). There are 100 ore to the Krone. Krone bills are available in the following denominations; 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1,000.

    Post Office And Telephone

    Post Office is located at Dronningens gate 15. Telephone cards can be purchased at the Post Office, Narvesens and/or newspapaer kiosks. Local coins are required to use public telephones. It is possible todial-direct for international calls, (00). You can also make a call with your personal calling card using the following access codes (coin may be required):

    AT&T: 800-19-011
    MCI: 800-19-912
    SPRINT: 800-19-877


    Tourist Information

    The tourist information office is located in the old Vestbanen railway station, Sentralstasjon.

    Transportation

    Taxis generally operate by meter or can be hired by the hour.

    Oslo has also a good bus and tram network, all services stop at Jernbanetorget opposite Oslo 'S' Station. Tickets are purchased on boarding. There is also a subway system, of which all lines converge at Stortinget, which is about a mile from the Cruiseship terminal.

    A ferry service operates from Radhusbrygge (City Hall Pier) to Bygdoy Peninsula, the site of the Viking Ships Museum, Kon-Tiki Museum and Fram Museum.


    Topics Related To Norway